The misnomer of “people of color” / Hispanics lumped in with Muslim migrants during protests

Still thinking on those articles I read last night from the local newspaper about the protest staged downtown over immigration issues. What I find particularly uncomfortable in all of that, though I may have stated it in last night’s post on here already, is how the situation is being framed publicly as pertaining mostly to Hispanic immigrants yet Muslim immigrants wind up quietly included in the discussion as well. That gives me pause since these ethnic groups are not one and the same, not by a long shot. Because both happen to be minorities in terms of population here, and also because both groups possess skin tones containing a bit more melanin than commonly found among those of Irish or Scottish descent, still DOES NOT automatically equate with them deserving to be lumped in the same classification. Yes, both groups contain migrants, illegal or otherwise, and that’s where the similarities end. Their religions drastically differ, as do their lifestyles and general work ethics (from what evidence shows). As does their potential to become true allies with Western citizens.

This has me a bit unnerved honestly. That Muslim immigrants were slid into these conversations under the common banner of “people of color” without any hesitation or discussion on the differences in threat levels pertaining to members among these varied demographics is unsettling. To be pressured to become a “sanctuary” state essentially for Hispanic persons is one thing (and even there we need to consider the different national origins included under the banner of Hispanic since obviously not all are Mexican natives — Colombian concerns being a separate line of inquiry there), but to have that extended to far-flung “refugees” from Middle Eastern and African nations strikes me as too broad of an initiative. Hispanics quite often are Catholics and therefore compatible with Judeo-Christian ethics common to the West. Muslim Arabs and Africans obviously are not and instead aim to implement their Sharia Law wherever they settle (seeing as how they do not seem capable or willing to separate law and order from their religious convictions). The latter express little to no interest in assimilating in the cultures they migrate into and yet seem keenly interested in propagating their native religious edicts wherever they roam even in blatant defiance of the laws of Western nations. This creates an incompatible conundrum.

It strikes me as unfair that all so-called “people of color” be categorized as one when it is so undeniably clear how much these ethnic groups do differ. And I am concerned that Hispanic people will wind up tarred and feathered (so to speak) right along with the Muslim factions hidden within these movements and protests because they will appear to be apologists on their behalf. Yet plenty (if not most) of these Hispanic persons themselves would prove incompatible with Muslim migrants and their ambitions once they better understand them. It looks to me like SJWs are combining these varied groups to push their own political objectives without taking into serious consideration how this will impact the very ethnic groups they claim to be trying to protect the interests of. In the case of Hispanics, the language barrier prevents some of those migrants from thoroughly comprehending the ways in which they are being used to suit others’ political causes.

Each ethnic group would be better served by remaining separate and distinct and focusing on the issues specific to their own group. Because otherwise they’ll just wind up being dragged into political battles that don’t directly pertain to them and that might tarnish their image in the eyes of the public when it’s completely unnecessary and of no benefit to them. Let the Muslim migrants fend for themselves on the public stage rather than sneaking them in under the cloak of “people of color” that are in actuality predominantly Hispanic protests. Muddies the water to do otherwise, and it will only further complicate Hispanic people’s dilemma. Especially once more of them awaken to the realization of who they’ve been assigned as bed-fellows through these nonprofit organizations claiming to be doing their bidding.

It’s an uncomfortable situation brewing currently. I won’t pretend I’m not a bit irritated with my former volunteer organization and the role it’s playing in muddling these matters. Well-intended as I don’t doubt they are. Still. This, to me, is just further evidence of how political ambitions can cloud one’s judgment and wind up making a bigger mess, especially for the people they primarily set out to help in the first place. Mexicans and other Hispanics need not be lumped in with Muslim migrants and doing so will very likely cause them greater problems on down the road. But I suppose they get to learn that the hard way. Won’t claim skin off the backs of employees within such nonprofit organizations since they are already legal citizens without a dog of their own directly in this fight, despite all their hand-wringing and virtue-signaling. It won’t be them who potentially face deportation, and it won’t be their livelihoods that wind up jeopardized in the end. They’ll just move on to another social justice issue and try to find a way to become relevant there. And on and on it goes.

The concern I personally extend toward the Hispanic community isn’t equal to that which I extend to the Muslim community. And I doubt I am alone in feeling this way. So combining these disparate groups together under one umbrella will likely only serve to hinder the objectives of Hispanics wishing to continue residing within the U.S. And I can’t see how that’s fair to them.