“Dark Secrets: Inside the Mind of a Serial Killer” (on the crimes of Richard Kuklinski)

“Police Brutality, Prejudice and Abuse with Sgt. Cheryl Dorsey”

“Filip Syta: Do What You Love Even If It Kills You”

The worst addiction for a human being is a monthly salary.

Word. Couldn’t agree more.

Very interesting listening to that man describe his time working for Google. This is what I keep saying: we humans are being treated more and more like pets these days. Now corporations have figured out how to groom us in this way so as to create dependency. All ye men who take issue with (some) women being treated as coddled princesses, notice that males are now receiving a similar treatment too through select corporate entities. And I don’t believe this new trend will fizzle out anytime soon, at least not for those in techie and other specialty fields deemed to be of high economic/commercial importance currently.

Incomes are a motherfucker though. Safety net, yes. Glad to avoid that, stressful as it can be at times to remain self-employed.

“Ryan Holiday: The Obstacle is the Way”

Sounds like an interesting author. Never heard of him before today. Cool that he worked with Robert Greene on his books. And I like that he mentioned stoicism and explained what it means to him and how those philosophical teachings are applied in his life.

“Steve Harvey: What Makes a Man in Today’s World”

Interested in checking out Steve’s book now.

TYT: How Drunkards, Whores & ‘The Immoral’ Shaped the Nation (w/ Thaddeus Russell)

Food for thought this evening:

Unmasked with George Carlin

I love listening to his stories. Listened to his audiobook Last Words, read by his brother, a couple years back and learned a lot more about him, and the interview above serves as a nice accompaniment.

I can’t help but envy his stance in no longer choosing to “have a stake” in the direction of our species. My prayer is that a little piece of George’s spirit will float down and somehow infuse me with a “fuck it” button as well.

Scientology Weirdness (Jason Beghe’s interview)

Stumbled across another scientology “documentary” (if it’s to be taken that seriously), and it tripped a thought of Jason Beghe’s interview on his involvement in scientology. Watched it a couple years ago and am now rewatching it tonight.

Scientology looks likes some weird Hollywood-promoted act. It’s a play on religion constructed with new-age, sci-fi, pseudoscientific “logic.” That’s why it takes on psychiatry — that’s its competition.

But then sometimes I wonder if scientology isn’t a clever attempt to demonstrate the absurdity of both religions (the dogma, not the spirituality religions were originally meant to help connect people with) and the fields of psychiatry and psychology when invested with so much power to decide the narrative applied to the entire population despite lacking evidence to support their basic premises.

The main premise being that humans’ psychological states deserve to be classified and treated as if “disorders,” frequently employing the metaphor “mental illness.” Yet who defines what “order” is by comparison? Is “order” simply what people with Ph.D.s and M.D.s say it should be? Is it what suits a functioning society, nevermind that our government is unarguably corrupt and that what we have going on today will prove unsustainable in the long-term? Why should we want to adapt to this unsustainable fantasy that is proving psychologically unhealthy? Because it makes living easier? No it doesn’t, not when so many people are living this deluded and/or depressed, having trouble finding meaning in a life that revolves around a paycheck or a salary and that has us pitted so bitterly against one another, locked in competition, communities and families destroyed in the process. We’re constructing a bizarro world in the U.S., and we feel discontent because so much of our time is preoccupied with bullshit. Welcome to modern times.

But anyway, back to scientology. What if it’s a cleverly orchestrated acting job intended to make a mockery out of both religious cults and pseudoscience? Because even if it’s not intended to suit that purpose, it’s sure doing a fine job. Interviews like that above also demonstrate just how easily people can get caught up in what they want to believe; like Beghe said, once people have invested time, money, and ego, it’s made all that much harder to turn back and critically assess the situation. Folks don’t like feeling like idiots. I don’t either, but I realize I am one.  lol

What interests me, though, is how deeply people are craving new narratives to follow. And I can relate to the yearning. Life is crazy, life is mad, to quote an Enigma song. But L. Ron Hubbard’s narrative proved to be—aside from being full-blown batshit—just another pyramid scheme and ridiculous hoop-jumping contest. But people buy it for reasons similar to why they buy into Evangelical Christianity. They want to belong to a community that appears to be leading the way. They want to direct their energies at something they wish to believe in.

And don’t we all, in one way, shape, or form?

Neil Postman on Cyberspace and Technology

This interview of Neil Postman is said to have been recorded in 1995:

Neil Postman discussing his book Technopoly on CSPAN2’s Booktv:

Dr. Faye Snyder speaks with Stefan Molyneux

What an excellent interview and discussion between Stefan Molyneux and Dr. Faye Snyder. So glad I was turned on to looking her up today. All this talk about childhood and development has me tripping down memory lane a bit, reflecting and thinking…

[TMI story-sharing since removed.]