“Mad, bad or sad? The Psychology of Personality Disorders – Professor Glenn D Wilson”

After much hunting I finally found his name: Charles Ray Hatcher (child rapist, murderer)

Took me over an hour to finally locate this case I was reflecting on, so I’m going to post about it here so as not to lose it again.

Charles_Ray_HatcherCharles Ray Hatcher was convicted for a number of offenses over the course of his life, including 16 murders and and the rape/sexual assault of minors.

I can’t recall how I first heard about this case but it was several years ago that I remember reading about his life story and criminal convictions. The tale that stood out to me most involved the 6-year-old boy named Gilbert Martinez whom he abducted and anally raped AND was caught in the act of assaulting out in a wooded area. The lurid detail in which the scene was described has haunted me ever since. So tonight it ran across my mind again and I went in search of the names involved.

Mr. Charles Ray Hatcher, born in Missouri in 1929, sentenced to several mental institutions and jails, proved incapable and/or unwilling to cease being intolerably evil. A rundown on his crimes are available here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Ray_Hatcher

Sick, sad motherfucker. Period.

Wish to god I could remember what book I read about him in or wherever I came across that accounting of his crimes. Been years and Google isn’t helping me out much on this. Frickin’ search engine is damn-near worthless these days, IMO. But whatever.

THAT guy. He’s one who keeps returning to my mind after all these years. The deeper details of his story are really upsetting to the point where he can’t help but be memorable. Most certainly not a good man, and it’s worthy of speculating as to why people like him come into being. Can we really pretend this individual turned out that way solely due to his own psychological problems? But what did those psychological problems stem from? I think a lot of us would point to his problem-riddled childhood, and fairly so. But I wonder what cocktail of factors is needed to push someone so completely over the edge like that to where they completely don’t give a shit about other human lives.

It’s worth pondering…

Hung himself in his cell in 1984. Good riddance…

A look into Jeffrey Dahmer

Sharing what I watched this evening, beginning with an interview with Jeffrey Dahmer and his parents shortly before he was killed:

Wasn’t keen on Stone Phillips covering that, but what’s done is done. Eh.

Footage from Jeffrey Dahmer’s trial:

Left my comments on both videos.

Makes me think of what Ernest Becker spoke of in his final book Escape From Evil about cannibalism and how one incorporates the mana power of another, how man has a zest for killing and hunting prey, and it also makes me think of how our modern discord can shape individuals who seek power in their own more “primitive” fashion. That being what humans are equipped to be capable of, and there existing a need to strive for some sort of meaning in what’s coming to feel like a nihilistic world.

How a person chooses to create such meaning opens up all sorts of possibilities, including seriously negative and sadistic attempts toward satiation.

That Dahmer was into the movie “Star Wars” I also find interesting since that film was inspired by writings of Joseph Campbell relating to the hero’s journey. And that’s all about trying to carve out one’s destiny and utilize one’s powers to do something, to prove something, to experience life and be what we are. Whatever that winds up being.

There’s an undeniably primal accent on Dahmer’s crimes and what he was attempting to achieve, shaded by modern frustrations and internalized taboos and family strife and whatever else. It’s a very interesting case study, and I am actually appreciative of Dahmer’s demeanor in the end. He confessed guilt once caught, told of his crimes without playing further games, and knew he deserved death as a result. Out of all the serial killers I’ve learned about over the years, this one is most definitely distinctive on several counts.

I could say more but the night is winding down.

When it comes to dangerous pedophiles, I favor a scorched earth approach.

Still awake. Earlier went in search of entertaining videos to get my mind off thoughts for a while and headed to Nate’s Vlogs channel (I’m a subscriber). Came across the following video (relevant portion beginning 2:30 in):

[Due to Nate’s first channel getting sacked by flagging assholes on youtube, this video is no longer available.]

Wow. That got me curious, so I went looking for more info on Geoffrey Leonard (Australian pedophile) and found the original A Current Affair clip:

Frickin’ nuts. And that, ladies and gentlemen, is why the death penalty ought to exist.

His name does ring a bell, though I didn’t recall the case.

One of his books indeed made it into the National Library of Australia.

A book by him made available online titled Razorwire: http://geoffreyleonard.tripod.com/razorwire.htm. Batshit is what it is.

So sick it’s astounding.

For further reading, Geoff Leonard responded in the comment section of this blog post in 2007.

Makes it conscientiously troubling to fly the “Life is Good” banner knowing people like that are out wandering around.

“Not a Love Story: A Film About Pornography”

“Not a Love Story: A Film About Pornography (1981)”:

Came across that Canadian documentary recently on one of Typhon Blue’s playlists.

The bondage porn shown around the 54:22 mark really fucks with my head. Ugh, tying titties like that makes absolutely no sense to me and looks like straight-up brutality. It’s virtually impossible to see it any other way, regardless of who may consider that pleasurable to experience or view.

There comes a point when ya just gotta stop, step away, and seriously reflect on what we’ve been fed. And why might such material be fed to the masses? Sure, there’s the economic incentives, and preying on humans’ psychologies has certainly proven lucrative across all sectors. A handful of major corporations no one would even associate with pornography reap in over 80% of its proceeds. Porn is not only big business, it’s big business for Big Businesses. But consider for a moment how much free porn is available online, no credit card or sign-up required (meaning no age verification required either). A few sites spring to mind, none of which I care to advertise for on here (not that I never look on them, just that I won’t help promote them to others). Why do you imagine porn has become free to the online masses?

There’s a lot of spooky shit going on these days, undeniably. I’m connecting dots and pondering what may lay in store going forward. Hell on earth, folks — slavery 3.0. Sorry to be yet another messenger bringing bad news. What worries me more is how many don’t see a problem with civilization’s progression. It’s all across the board fucked up what humans are creating here, and the problem doesn’t lie in the technologies themselves but rather in their application. Just look around — what a world…

Dangerous Knowledge (from the BBC)

This BBC film titled “Dangerous Knowledge” tackles some of the profound questions about the true nature of reality that mathematical thinkers are still trying to answer today.


Dangerous Knowledge (1/5) by xSilverPhinx


Dangerous Knowledge (2/5) by xSilverPhinx


Dangerous Knowledge (3/5) by xSilverPhinx


Dangerous Knowledge (4/5) by xSilverPhinx


Dangerous Knowledge (5/5) by xSilverPhinx

Interesting food for thought, even for those of us who aren’t particularly mathematically-inclined.

The Birth of Humanity, an ongoing process — Ch. 3 excerpt from the book “The Sane Society”

Carrying on this evening transcribing where I left off in Chapter 3 (page 31) in Erich Fromm’s book The Sane Society (1955):

The animal is content if its physiological needs—its hunger, its thirst and its sexual needs—are satisfied. Inasmuch as man is also animal, these needs are likewise imperative and must be satisfied. But inasmuch as man is human, the satisfaction of these instinctual needs is not sufficient to make him happy; they are not even sufficient to make him sane. The archimedic point of the specifically human dynamism lies in this uniqueness of the human situation; the understanding of man’s psyche must be based on the analysis of man’s needs stemming from the conditions of his existence.

The problem, then, which the human race as well as each individual has to solve is that of being born. Physical birth, if we think of the individual, is by no means as decisive and singular an act as it appears to be. It is, indeed, an important change from intrauterine into extrauterine life; but in many respects the infant after birth is not different from the infant before birth; it cannot perceive things outside, cannot feed itself; it is completely dependent on the mother, and would perish without her help. Actually, the process of birth continues. The child begins to recognize outside objects, to react affectively, to grasp things and to coordinate his movements, to walk. But birth continues. The child learns to speak, it learns to know the use and function of things, it learns to relate itself to others, to avoid punishment and gain praise and liking. Slowly, the growing person learns to love, to develop reason, to look at the world objectively. He begins to develop his powers; to acquire a sense of identity, to overcome the seduction of his senses for the sake of an integrated life. Birth, then, in the conventional meaning of the word, is only the beginning of birth in the broader sense. The whole life of the individual is nothing but the process of giving birth to himself; indeed, we should be fully born, when we die—although it is the tragic fate of most individuals to die before they are born.

From all we know about the evolution of the human race, the birth of man is to be understood in the same sense as the birth of the individual. When man had transcended a certain threshold of minimum instinctive adaptation, he ceased to be an animal; but he was as helpless and unequipped for human existence as the individual infant is at birth. The birth of man began with the first members of the species homo sapiens, and human history is nothing but the whole process of this birth. It has taken man hundreds of thousands of years to take the first steps into human life; he went through a narcissistic phase of magic omnipotent orientation, through totemism, nature worship, until he arrived at the beginnings of the formation of conscience, objectivity, brotherly love. In the last four thousand years of his history, he has developed visions of the fully born and fully awakened man, visions expressed in not too different ways by the great teachers of man in Egypt, China, India, Palestine, Greece and Mexico.

The fact that man’s birth is primarily a negative act, that of being thrown out of the original oneness with nature, that he cannot return to where came from, implies that the process of birth is by no means an easy one. Each step into his new human existence is frightening. It always means to give up a secure state, which was relatively known, for one which is new, which one has not yet mastered. Undoubtedly, if the infant could think at the moment of the severance of the umbilical cord, he would experience the fear of dying. A loving fate protects us from this first panic. But at any new step, at any new stage of our birth, we are afraid again. We are never free from two conflicting tendencies: one to emerge from the womb, from the animal form of existence into a more human existence, from bondage to freedom; another, to return to the womb, to nature, to certainty and security. In the history of the individual, and of the race, the progressive tendency has proven to be stronger, yet the phenomena of mental illness and the regression of the human race to positions apparently relinquished generations ago, show the intense struggle which accompanies each new act of birth.

Man’s Needs—as They Stem from the Conditions of His Existence

Man’s life is determined by the inescapable alternative between regression and progression, between return to animal existence and arrive at human existence. Any attempt to return is painful, it inevitably leads to suffering and mental sickness, to death either physiologically or mentally (insanity). Every step forward is frightening and painful too, until a certain point has been reached where fear and doubt have only minor proportions. Aside from the physiologically nourished cravings (hunger, thirst, sex), all essential human cravings are determined by this polarity. Man has to solve a problem, he can never rest in the given situation of a passive adaptation to nature. Even the most complete satisfaction of all his instinctive needs does not solve his human problem; his most intensive passions and needs are not those rooted in his body, but those rooted in the very peculiarity of his existence.

There lies also the key to humanistic psychoanalysis. Freud, searching for the basic force which motivates human passions and desires, believed he had found it in the libido. But powerful as the sexual drive and all its derivations are, they are by no means the most powerful forces within man and their frustration is not the cause of mental disturbance. The most powerful forces motivating man’s behavior stem from the condition of his existence, the “human situation.”

Man cannot live statically because his inner contradictions drive him to seek for an equilibrium, for a new harmony instead of the lost animal harmony with nature. After he has satisfied his animal needs, he is driven by his human needs. While his body tells him what to eat and what to avoid—his conscience ought to tell him which needs to cultivate and satisfy, and which needs to let wither and starve out. But hunger and appetite are functions of the body with which man is born—conscience, while potentially present, requires the guidance of men and principles which develop only during the growth of culture.

All passions and strivings of man are attempts to find an answer to his existence or, as we may also say, they are an attempt to avoid insanity. (It may also be said in passing that the real problem of mental life is not why some people become insane, but rather why why most avoid insanity.) Both the mentally healthy and the neurotic are driven by the need to find an answer, the only difference being that one answer corresponds more to the total needs of man, and hence is more conducive to the unfolding of his powers and to his happiness than the other. All cultures provide for a patterned system in which certain solutions are predominant, hence certain strivings and satisfactions. Whether we deal with primitive religions, with theistic or non-theistic religions, they are all attempts to give an answer to man’s existential problem. The finest, as well as the most barbaric cultures have the same function—the difference is only whether the answer given is better or worse. The deviate from the cultural pattern is just as much in search of an answer as his more well-adjusted brother. His answer may be better or worse than the one given by his culture—it is always another answer to the same fundamental question raised by human existence. In this sense all cultures are religious and every neurosis is a private form of religion, provided we mean by religion an attempt to answer the problems of human existence. Indeed, the tremendous energy in the forces producing mental illness, as well as those those behind art and religion, could never be understood as an outcome of frustrated or sublimated physiological needs; they are attempts to solve the problem of being born human. All men are idealists and cannot help being idealists, provided we mean by idealism the striving for the satisfaction of needs which are specifically human and transcend the physiological needs of the organism. The difference is only that one idealism is a good and adequate solution, the other a bad and destructive one. The decision as to what is good and bad has to be made on the basis of our knowledge of man’s nature and the laws which govern its growth.

What are these needs and passions stemming from the existence of man?

[Italicized emphasis his.]

Stopping on page 35, to be continued another day…