“Waking Up With Sam Harris #42 – Racism and Violence in America (with Glenn Loury)”

Have now added the books mentioned to my Audible wishlist: On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City by Alice Goffman and Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America by Jill Leovy.

A look into Jeffrey Dahmer

Sharing what I watched this evening, beginning with an interview with Jeffrey Dahmer and his parents shortly before he was killed:

Wasn’t keen on Stone Phillips covering that, but what’s done is done. Eh.

Footage from Jeffrey Dahmer’s trial:

Left my comments on both videos.

Makes me think of what Ernest Becker spoke of in his final book Escape From Evil about cannibalism and how one incorporates the mana power of another, how man has a zest for killing and hunting prey, and it also makes me think of how our modern discord can shape individuals who seek power in their own more “primitive” fashion. That being what humans are equipped to be capable of, and there existing a need to strive for some sort of meaning in what’s coming to feel like a nihilistic world.

How a person chooses to create such meaning opens up all sorts of possibilities, including seriously negative and sadistic attempts toward satiation.

That Dahmer was into the movie “Star Wars” I also find interesting since that film was inspired by writings of Joseph Campbell relating to the hero’s journey. And that’s all about trying to carve out one’s destiny and utilize one’s powers to do something, to prove something, to experience life and be what we are. Whatever that winds up being.

There’s an undeniably primal accent on Dahmer’s crimes and what he was attempting to achieve, shaded by modern frustrations and internalized taboos and family strife and whatever else. It’s a very interesting case study, and I am actually appreciative of Dahmer’s demeanor in the end. He confessed guilt once caught, told of his crimes without playing further games, and knew he deserved death as a result. Out of all the serial killers I’ve learned about over the years, this one is most definitely distinctive on several counts.

I could say more but the night is winding down.

Very important: “Don’t Talk to Police”

Rule numero uno: We have the right to remain silent.

Here’s a law school professor and former criminal defense attorney, followed by a cop, spelling out why we should never agree to be interviewed by the police:

A glimpse into police misconduct

Switching gears this evening from transcribing, which I will return to periodically, I’d like instead tonight to focus on a few examples of misconduct by authority figures, in this instance, the police.

In a new lawsuit, Angel Dobbs and her niece Ashley Dobbs, of Irving Texas, say they were searched inside their underwear by female Texas Trooper, Kelley Helleson, after a routine traffic stop in Dallas in July.

The trooper who pulled them over, David Farrell, says on tape he saw them throw a cigarette butt out the window and smelled marijuana when he pulled them over. No drugs were found and they were released with a warning. The [relatives] say the trooper who performed the search used the same pair of gloves on both women.

 

Here is the same video as that above, this time un-edited and full length (though glitchy to where it repeats in places).

Here’s a link to the WFAA-TV news story on that presented above. And here’s a link to the lawsuit filed by the women in the above video against Texas State Trooper David Ferrell (dated December 2012). An excerpt from the lawsuit follows:

“This intrusive cavity search occurred on the side of a public freeway illuminated by lights from the police vehicle in full view of the passing public,” the lawsuit reads. “Moreover, this roadside body cavity search was done without her consent.”

 

Damn. And all because that trooper claims he smelled marijuana in the car. That’s it and that’s all.

Next, we have the case of “Breakfast in Collinsville (with Michael Reichert),”a well-made video containing the original police video footage that led to a well-deserved lawsuit for an illegal search:

The gist: On December 4th 2011, StarTrek fans Terrance Huff and Jon Seaton are stopped illegally after a StarTrek Exhibition for suspected drug transportation in Collinsville, Illinois. Award winning filmmaker Terrance Huff does a breakdown of an illegal traffic stop and subsequent search involving a K9 Officer who has a questionable past.

 

How much bullshit was that traffic stop? Talk about blatantly violating this man’s civil rights. Think this shit is rare? Think again. There are good police officers, and there are bad ones, and in a system that’s increasingly putting the squeeze on people with integrity—that is, quality, law-observing police officers—how long can we assume it will be before decent people no longer comprise the majority of officers on the force?

 

“No one can be good for long if goodness is not in demand. — Bertolt Brecht

 

At what point do we as a citizenry start getting real with ourselves and one another on the direction our society is taking? There’s a lot to take in today, and an indecipherable, complicated profusion of laws on the books combined with the degraded state of law enforcement is a very significant concern confronting our society. With law books rendered unnecessarily complicated by a ceaseless stream of new laws introduced, plenty of which are unneeded and/or unenforceable, we’re put in a situation where individuals cannot possibly keep up with what all is legal or illegal, and thereby we are hindered and compromised when it comes to protecting and legally defending our rights and interests. This, of course, involves various outlying factors that further complicate the situation, including the debased state of our political system and the impact economics have on all sectors of society, but that’s beyond the scope of today’s post.

Carrying on…

After Angela Garbarino was arrested in Shreveport, Louisiana last November [2007?] on suspicion of drunk driving, she wound up lying on the police station floor in a pool of her own blood with two black eyes, a broken nose, two broken teeth, and other cuts and bruises.

Garbarino says that Officer Wiley Willis beat her up after turning off the police video camera. Willis’s attorney insists that Garbarino slipped and fell when Willis tried to prevent her from leaving the room. However, Garbarino says that the extent of her injuries are proof that she was beaten.

 

Here’s the 2011 case of Florida Trooper Watts pulling over Miami Police Officer Fausto Lopez abusing the power of his position by traveling off-duty to his side job at speeds purportedly surpassing 120 mph:

Feeling sorry for the Miami cop in the video above? Consider the following video of Miami cops mistreating a peaceful protester and then laughing about it later on camera:

Continuing on…

That’s enough of that for now. A topic to be revisited another day.