Further pondering on protests and resistance

Currently finishing up watching this conversation concerning the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, VA:

After having filmed my own reaction to the event earlier this evening. I do get irritated with movements…

Sometimes I feel like a dog barking on the sidelines. Heh  But I live nowhere near where this stuff’s been happening, so online is where it’s at.

Taking in what I can on this event and continuing to ponder. Hate antifa getting away with starting shit and whoever’s calling the shots in ordering police restraint are indeed letting them get away with it. Saw it at the University of California protests too.

And, admittedly, the car crash is pretty odd. Some details surrounding that do sound kinda strange. Gonna have to wait to hear how that all shakes out.

Ditto on the helicopter crash.

I don’t mean to seem aggravated with everybody involved since I do understand that white folks have a right to stand up for themselves by peaceably assembling. Every other race of people have no problem doing so. The Political Left has gone nutty, big time, and appears largely unconstrained by this point. We know this goes higher. So what can be done about this?

Are we losing our right to peaceably assemble on top of free speech? Looks like it. I know responses are necessary, but it becomes a question of what might even prove effective at this juncture. MSM has been useless for years. Google’s decided to act up, which could threaten the internet as we know it (particularly Youtube) and obstruct the flow of information. This is where we’re at currently.

Then you mix people carrying nazi flags into the crowd and turn off potential allies further. Why? Some say they were either planted there or just were stupid tools without the sense to realize they weren’t helping. I’m willing to bet a few of the latter were there, and what can be done about that? Their presence does not help in the least. Sets everything back. Totalitarianism sucks, as do its promoters and sympathizers. People see that and want nothing more to do with any of you. So much for making progress in that respect.

How do you keep plants, instigators, and idiots out of a movement? Probably can’t. And because of them others don’t wish to join ranks. Disturbs folks with decent sensibilities. So then what? Keep tolerating your rallies being sabotaged?

Perhaps that’s the problem in a nutshell — maybe all can come out for a common cause but need to self-segregate, plus you need more than Right-wingers and nazi-sympathizers. There’s a whole bunch of us outside of the Left-Right paradigm who feel strongly about free speech issues but we’re not going to stand alongside people displaying swastikas. They can sport whatever they wish, but I don’t have to associate with it willingly. Not gonna either. Some of us have as big a problem with those types as we do antifa and  black supremacists. People need to come together to defend shared values, but damn. On one hand it feels petty to worry about protesting alongside some nazi-wannabe douche, but the reality is that most of us will refuse to do so. Just flat out. Argue all you want on the matter, remind us about their right to assemble also — yeah, sure, great…still. Changes nothing. People won’t go for it. Just saying. Makes one feel sick just in contemplating doing so. Because it’s not only about a long ago time in German history — it’s about the trajectory of collectivistic ideologies. Communism runs the same way. That trend is insidious and persistent.

No one in their right mind wants to defend or help totalitarians. Leave it to Leftists to make excuses for antifa, a bunch of commie provocateurs, because they apparently don’t have the sense to recognize that those jackasses aren’t truly liberal and are savages and will turn on them in due time. Antifa is paving the way to some Orwellian shit, bused in on rich people’s dimes to ruin people’s rallies, treated with kid’s gloves by the mainstream media outlets. I see it for what it is. And I wonder how one might get around it.

On one hand you have to appeal to the rest of society, because numbers do matter when it comes to physically standing your ground. But you can’t make that appeal while fascism-loving plants and idiots are hovering over your shoulders. On the other hand, the internet won’t save us. Most will probably watch rather than offer to lend a hand. I’m not even sure what we could do in person. Get beat by the cops, go to jail, and consequently lose our jobs? Get maced by commie shitheads, knowing if we do try to defend ourselves that we’ll likely wind up being the ones on trial? Only to have the whole thing spun against us by the legacy media?

OK. That’s one approach. Is there a smarter, more effective option than that? This is what I’m stewing on over here tonight. Seems to me people need to be united under something better than Left/Right politics and race identity groups. That right there appears to be creating the biggest obstacle for resistance.

More on Charlottesville chaos

Styxhexenhammer666’s take on it:

Exactly! I hate seeing those damn nazi flags, especially at American rallies. Southern heritage has absolutely nothing to do with Nazi bullshit and doesn’t deserve to be conflated with it. Sends the wrong message and tarnishes what protection of Southern monuments is supposed to be about. Ugh! Seriously not a fan of that tactic and will be SO GLAD when so-called Alt-Right supporters wake up and kick out those racist extremists who preach about being pro-Nazi and broadly anti-Semitic. THAT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AMERICAN SOCIETY, nor should it. Makes a complete mess out of the whole situation when all are tossed in together, and it gives an incredibly bad impression to onlookers in the general public. Hence why I personally cannot align myself with a movement like the Alt Right on principle — being critical of culture clashes and race relations gone wild in the U.S. has fuck all to do with nazi propaganda, and it should remain that way! Makes me sick. We’re not Germany here, thank GOD. So why lump yourself in with those who support such bigotry? It’s nonsensical and only hurts your cause, providing additional fodder to those you claim to oppose. Bad tactic all the way around, plus it lowers what reasonable support you people might otherwise garner from your fellow Americans who don’t wish to affiliate with Hitler-worshiping bullshit.

Fly the American flag. Fly the rebel flag. But to hell with Nazi symbols. That is NOT a product of our culture nor in any way representative of Southern heritage and it has NO PLACE in our American protests. Fucking period. Shouldn’t have to say that. Quit making American conservatives look like fools in this way.

Agreed with Styx on disliking David Duke as well. Truly whatever that man endorses turns to shit. He’s an unabashed racist who winds up polarizing any movement he involves himself in. Not a fan. “He’s the white Al Sharpton.” Precisely. Just a complete charlatan. If he’s winds up on my side of the fence, then I have to pause and wonder where I’m fucking up, because I don’t want to be lumped in with asshats like him. And I say this as someone born in Mississippi who has appreciation for plenty of aspects of Southern culture and heritage. But the KKK? That’s an organization belonging among historical relics that doesn’t deserve to be resurrected. May better (higher) principles prevail in going forward.

Have we all gone fucking insane, Styx asks? Unfortunately it appears so.

Carrying on, Lionel Nation’s coverage of this ordeal:

I can see what he’s saying about such events being used to bolster government-backed agendas that we the people really don’t want and won’t benefit from, as in limiting what we can say by ushering in “hate speech” legislation and censoring more and more of the internet (gee thanks Google!).

This is a “controlled demolition,” a “controlled implosion” of a society…hate it but I know it’s true. Disaster Capitalism rolls on. And so many of our fellow Americans buy into it and believe what they see on the ground is real and organically produced. This is the deployment of a divide and conquer strategy orchestrated from on high, and the sooner we recognize that, the better. Lionel is right that this ball has been rolling for a long time now, and plenty of us began paying closer attention in the aftermath of 9/11. It’s still going and it will get worse. Because some big wigs desire it to be so in order to promote their own globalist agendas that have ABSOLUTELY NO CONCERN FOR THE WELL-BEING OF OUR NATION. Period. THEY DON’T GIVE A FUCK ABOUT US. Not one bit. Never have and never will. This is their power grab and their game, and we are just pawns to be used and abused as seen fit. Not to say that we don’t possess any power here, but more often than not people are playing right into their hands by letting petty grievances divide us. None of us will be better off on down the road as a result, no matter what they might promise your interest group. THEY ARE USING YOU. And they will continue to do so as long as you let them, angry black people and your white Leftist “allies,” Muslim and Hispanic immigrants, white nationalists and other “identitarians,” and all the rest who parrot their MSM-advertised talking points and who tolerate how the game is being rigged. It is not being rigged in your favor, no matter what you might wish to think at any given point in time. One “side” of the political divide isn’t winning or losing — down here on the ground it’s all a losing game.

This is a fascinating and terrifying time to be alive, folks.

Wow. Shit’s ramping up (in Charlottesville, VA).

As usual, I was one of the last to hear about this rally in Virginia.

Not sure what to think of it all just yet. Just observing for the time being. Though I will say that I can understand why conservative white folks are so upset and feel the need to take a stand up against all this bullying from the Political Left that’s steadily been mounting in recent years. What did people expect would happen? That all white people would just lay down and take it without resisting? Did others assume they were simply weak and ineffective and unwilling to respond? That was a foolish assumption.

But I really don’t wish for our country to divide further. Many of us don’t wish to for segregation, though those who want to live apart certainly are free to go try that. I, for one, will not stand in anybody’s way if they do decide to self-segregate. Mostly I worry about people trying to force others out. We have enough hostility already. And I don’t think it’s an accident that tensions are being brought to this fever pitch. Lots of politically-sown divisiveness has been occurring in recent years, and we all know it. Then this Muslim immigration bullshit thanks Hillary Clinton’s State Department. That was a a tactical move, certainly not a naive oversight.

So what did people think might happen? The U.S. cannot withstand a major culture clash of that magnitude. We’re already experiencing an internal culture clash due to ideological differences. There’s only so much a society can take before we all wind up hurt as a result. The Muslim influx has made many of very nervous, and for good reason. Incompatible worldviews, religions and values — perhaps insurmountable at this point in history. The Middle East is their home, so whatever refugee aid people would like to offer to them would be best done on those folks’ own soil. Because it’s becoming very clear that not all can live together, not when there’s a demonstrable lack of respect shown for our Western civilizations and not when we already are experiencing far too much internal tensions among our own peoples (and by that I am referring to those affiliated with BLM and similar movements, like antifa, that are working hard to censor opposing speech and intimidate people on college campuses and in workplaces, who have overtaken the MSM with their political narratives that they actively try to suppress us all with, and who accuse anybody and everybody of “racism” or “sexism” or some other “ism” for not toeing their line). It’s all gone too far and is making people sick with frustration and indignation. As to be expected.

You know what this protest here also reminds me of? That Black Panther march up in Milwaukee back around Christmas time:

Free us or you die crackers…

Yet no one interrupted their protest march, despite the sort of language they were using and the fact that they were carrying weapons. Yet people want to get upset with a bunch of white folks carrying tiki torches and not threatening to kill anybody. See the difference? This is why so many people are fed up. And I can understand where they’re coming from.

BUT, I take issue with those who want to make this into a purely racial dispute. It is not. It is ideological in nature fundamentally. There are plenty of whites and blacks and others on both/all sides of the aisle. I refuse to side with people based only on arbitrary criteria such as race when that so obviously isn’t what’s at the root of the clash occurring. Racial grievances are being stoked by influential types like Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, Oprah Winfrey, and their ilk. The racial grievance industry has made a whole lot of money through telling people how disadvantaged they are and convincing them that the blame lies with white people. Why do they say this, aside from making money? Because civil unrest suits their interests. That, or they know not what they’re doing (which I don’t believe for a second). The more fight among one another, the more they always stand to benefit. I agree when it comes to severely limiting Muslim immigration to this country since that’s necessary for maintaining the West, but for those of us already living here with generations of family born on this soil, this is our home and we cannot help but be in this together. Many of us love one another despite our perceived differences. And we do not want our fellow Americans to be categorically mistreated because tempers run too high. That is no good. That will only cause more pain to pay forward for generations to come. Too many of us are capable of working together where it really counts, and so this is the time to start acting like it, petty grievances aside.

Here I’ll offer up one voice of reason:

That man is right.

Please, dear God, don’t let us become blinded and unjust toward one another out of misplaced anger. While it’s understandable why people feel as they do, we have to be cognizant of what we’re doing so that we don’t make it all so much worse for ourselves and others undeserving of being targeted. That is my prayer this evening.

Journaling on a Friday night in mid-August (on my friend’s mortality, plus an update)

So it’s been 8.5 weeks since committing to stop drinking. That’s really good, and I’m proud of myself on this. Demonstrating my will power to choose to do better, for all those out there who, for whatever reasons, like to downplay the significance of will power. Can’t claim to comprehend what those folks are talking about there, seeing as how we’re always presented with options and even people with a whole lot working against them that one might imagine would never succeed have proven they could rise on the right occasion. When they made up their mind to do so and backed it with determined effort. I take inspiration from such people.

Yesterday happened to be my mother’s birthday. Decided to send her a text today, to which she replied saying she’d received flowers from the man she’s dating now. We haven’t interacted via text in several months prior to this exchange, per our norm. Yesterday also marked the day I decided to give up smoking herb for a solid couple of weeks. Hadn’t been partaking in it much since quitting drinking, but I still worry about replacing one crutch for another. So I simply decided to take a hiatus from that as well. Will be good for me. Might bore me into going to bed earlier and actually working out more than twice a week.

Hadn’t been inside a bar in about 2 weeks until today (where I ordered iced tea, of course). There I ran into a female friend and her ex-husband (those two remain close friends), having not seem either of them in months and him specifically since long before his last heart attack back in May. Might’ve been before Christmas since he and I last spoke. So I asked questions and he shared what all he’s been going through with that, plus he filled me in on details about his last heart attack 12 years ago as well as his mini-stroke 11 years ago. Also, he had underwent having a pacemaker put in back in March, which is what likely saved his life during this latest heart attack. Though when he collapsed he managed to fall and hit his head hard, resulting in a concussion that caused periodic bouts of dizziness for a month or more. They say he might live another couple of years at the rate he’s going. He’s now 61 years old, thankful to have healthcare coverage, currently living off the remains of his 401k while waiting for acceptance on disability coverage, with plans to file for early retirement next year so as to collect social security benefits. He had always worked up until the events of this spring, but now he’s unable to fulfill the duties of his job.

He spoke of the medications they have him on and their side effects, the doctors visits and body scans, and the insomnia he’s now plagued with. But what really struck a chord with me was when he talked about their young grandson and how he’s spending as much time as he can with him and letting him know how much he loves him. Says he can’t take anything for granted anymore. I got pretty misty-eyed listening to that portion of his story.

Mortality. The hardest part seems to be knowing that your days are numbered. His father and grandfather both suffered heart attacks and died relatively young, so he’s not counting on outliving them by much. Not that I can blame him there. He has to reckon with this to the best of his ability based on the information he’s being confronted with.

He’s a good man. Very sweet and caring. A good provider and overseer for his family, despite the divorce. Told me that he’s always adored me as well, and the feeling is mutual. A part of me does love that man, just because he has a good spirit. He will be missed, but like he said, we shouldn’t mourn him when he’s gone, we should celebrate life and living.

Wish I could make it to his eclipse party later this month, but I’ll be busy working like always. Will think of him when that eclipse does darken the sky midday on August 21st, knowing how excited he is to experience it during his lifetime (said it’d been 99 years since the last one that was viewable from coast to coast). He does love to watch the heavens for activity. In fact, he and his ex-wife were the first ones to point out to me the space station moving past overhead a couple years ago. I’d probably have never noticed otherwise.

Does make me a little sad to see him still drinking despite his heart condition. He said he knows he probably should quit, but he’d also like to enjoy what time he has left and drinking is a big part of their lifestyles. I didn’t say much to any of that since it’s none of my business. Just worry for him is all, but I don’t need to state that out loud to him. It’s his life, and who knows what the future holds. Conventional wisdom doesn’t prove correct in every individual case, so sometimes you just gotta let the dice roll.

Their family has been through a great deal this year, from his failing health to their son’s apartment burning down due to an electrical fire, etc. She said their son is taking his father’s health problems pretty hard. I imagine. It’s a sad situation. But nothing can be done about it. Death is unavoidable.

Something else this man said that troubled me: he’s not worried about dying so much as who’s going to have to be the one to find his body. He’s worried for his family members being put through that trauma. Yeah, that’s heart-wrenching to deeply consider, knowing all of them and imagining how hard it would hit them inside. All I could do was just pat his leg on that since there aren’t words to comfort somebody wrestling with such thoughts. Then he broke into a bit of a joke about dying on his riding lawn mower. He’s a truly sweet-spirited person who thinks about everybody else first. Couldn’t change his nature if he tried.

We told one another to not be strangers, and I do hope to see him again sooner rather than later. Told my female friend goodbye and I left. That’s all the heaviness I could sit with in that hour.

I didn’t mean to walk away, but it felt like I needed to once all had been said that needed to be said for one day. I miss him a little bit already. Only met the man a couple years ago but he’s one of those sweet souls who leaves a positive mark whether he means to or not. We got along right off the bat, which is saying something since I’m not known for being compatible with just anybody and everybody. Told his ex-wife, my friend, that she can call me whenever she wants to talk and that I’ll be here for them. And I mean it. That family was really good to me when I met them by random chance a couple years back during a particularly bad depression spell. They befriended me and have remained kind toward me, even when I wound up pulling away over the last year so as to tend to my own matters. Now is a good time to reconnect and to find ways to help out as needed. I do need to make an effort at that, to not let it slide as if there’s always enough time. Time runs out. People grow old. Health declines. The only thing that really matters in this world are our people, however we might define that. Our relationships are what matter most. Everything else just winds up fading away without a second thought.

We just kept hugging each other. Communion in its truest form. He didn’t seem scared about all of this, but I know he’s afraid of leaving people who love and depend on him. But he’s likely still got time, maybe another year or two or more. Never know. But I know I need to step up as a friend and be around more instead of retreating to my home. And I’m going to. Been wanting to for a long while and now it feels very necessary.

What I really ought to do is make them dinner or snacks to take over sometimes. And we really ought to do game nights again like we used to. Those were always fun. Make a few more good memories while time permits.

Spoke to my former partner on the phone tonight and told him about all of that. He’s met them a handful of times in the past. Then I cooked spaghetti with a side of steamed green beans for dinner. Worked out earlier in the day with my gym trainer. Have an early morning tomorrow, so for the rest of the night I intend to relax.

The latest audiobook I completed (coincidentally) and really appreciated was Antidote: Happiness For People Who Can’t Stand Positive Thinking by Oliver Burkeman. A very worthwhile book. Currently re-listening to A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy by William B. Irvine.

Ten Jewish authors I appreciate

Since I keep hearing and reading online so much negativity blaming Jewish folks for everything under the sun, I figure now would be a good time to post up something positive and share a few of the notable Jewish authors in my book collection. In no particular order:

1.) Erich Fromm — Might as well begin with the most obvious since I’ve mentioned his works time and time again on here and my YT channel. Thus far I’ve read 12 books by this man (excerpts are linked where available):Escape_From_Freedom_Fromm

Not all are personal favorites, but as a collection unto themselves they’ve certainly served as interesting food for thought over time.

2.) Richard L. Rubenstein — His book The Cunning of History: The Holocaust and the American Future provided a lot to seriously consider when I first came across it about 8-9 years ago. Shared copies with friends, though I can’t say for sure if any of them actually read him.

choose-yourself_Altucher3.) James Altucher — His audiobook Choose Yourself: Be Happy, Makes Millions, Live the Dream actually proved useful during a very depressing spell a couple years back. His promotion of what he refers to as the “Four Daily Practices” (basically caring for our emotional, mental, physical, and spiritual health) are what I needed to hear at the time and helped improve my mindset and outlook. Happen to be re-listening to it this week for kicks and giggles — he’s a pretty funny guy. Originally came across him accidentally by way of his blog, as so many people do. He encourages people to routinely itemize ideas in lists of 10 or more (on any subject we fancy) so as to flex and expand our “idea muscle.” Good idea, James.  wink

4.) Steven Pinker — Earlier this year I completed the audio version (after initially receiving a print copy as a gift) of his book The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined, which I did quibble over quite a bit and still am not sold on the data and arguments presented therein. But its content was worth considering. Still chewing it over. Perhaps it deserves to be mentioned that several years back I received a copy of his book The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature as a gift as well, though I have yet to read that one (planning to listen to the audio version eventually instead, having recently loaned out my print copy).

5.) Yuval Noah Harari — Came across this author by random chance earlier this year and listened to his audiobook Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind.

6.) Richard P. Feynman — Originally I received as a gift a few years back a copy of his book Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman!, following that with listening to The Pleasure of Finding Things Out: The Best Short Works of Richard P. Feynman and What Do You Care What Other People Think?: Further Adventures of a Curious Character. He offered up some very thought-provoking essays (along with quirky personal stories).

What_Is_Life_Margulis_Sagan7.) Lynn Margulis and Dorion Sagan — After first learning of their book What Is Life? on Dr. Corey Anton’s YT channel, I ordered a used copy online. Loved it and share it with others (especially young people — makes a great gift). Followed that with the audio version of their book Dazzle Gradually: Reflections on the Nature of Nature, which contains a couple stories that particularly stick in my mind and inform my imagination. So far I’m very impressed with what I’ve come across from this mother/son authoring duo.

8.) Dan Ariely — A family member first introduced me to his book Predictably Irrational. Later, I picked up a copy of The Honest Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone–Especially Ourselves. Both are worth reading.

9.) Leonard Mlodinow — His audiobook Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior remains among my favorites. Following that, I purchased a print copy of his and Deepak Chopra’s book War of the Worldviews: Science vs. Spirituality, which I happened to find fascinating. Wasn’t a fan of Deepak Chopra prior to reading that book but came to see their viewpoints as not necessarily diametrically opposed to one another, despite initial outward appearances (even after watching footage of them debating). Can’t make a clear case for why I see it that way — it’s just how their written back-and-forth arguments resonated with me. I personally found both books valuable.

Deathbird-Stories-Ellison10.) Harlan Ellison — Can’t recall how I first came across his books, not being a regular reader of fiction, but somehow his collections of short stories crossed my radar. The two books I have read by him thus far are Strange Wine and Deathbird Stories. His writing skills are undeniably impressive, and it’s a pleasure to occasionally take time out to retreat into the products of his imagination.

Surely I could locate several more Jewish authors within my book collection (Elie Wiesel, Sigmund Freud, Otto Rank, Karl Polanyi, Karl Popper, Viktor Frankl, Isaac Asimov, Michael Pollan, Stanley Milgram, Jonathan Haidt, Robert Heilbroner, Steven Levitt, Ayn Rand, Thomas Szasz, Jared Diamond, etc. — come to find out enough to populate another list or two), but my goal today was simply to list the first ten that came to mind.

And perhaps presenting this list will serve as a deterrent to those online who might otherwise feel the desire to ask me, as someone did just yesterday, if I’ve considered “the Jewish question.”  ??  To which I flippantly responded about my appreciation for several Jewish authors (hence what motivated me to create this list in the first place) and for Mel Brooks’ films, on top of being an enthusiastic lifelong fan of Weird Al Yankovich who just so happened to marry a Jewish woman. So…there’s your answer, in a nutshell. And if being anti-Semitic is expected or required of those who align themselves with the so-called Alt-Right, well then, that’s just one more movement/political camp I need not concern myself too much with. Not a fan of movements of any kind anyway. Nor of categorically demonizing and scapegoating whole groups/classes/races of people based on arbitrary criteria so as to suit ideological ends. That’s not my bag.

Sunday afternoon conversation with Grandma (on farming, past race relations, and our changing times)

Just got off the phone with my Grandma. From time to time she gets to tripping down memory lane, telling about her life while growing up out on the farm. Listened to her tell of all they work they had to do back then, from tending to the hogs and plowing the fields, to picking cotton and growing a wide variety of vegetables. Plus caring for the chickens and milking the cow, churning butter, picking figs and peas and butter beans, etc. She told about how for several years her father would recruit black men looking for day labor positions to help pick the cotton and how a black woman named Mrs. Annie helped facilitate it so that all the men would be ready to be picked up on the day of hire and how she’d also oversee when wages were paid out later in the day for the amount of cotton collected, ensuring all was accepted as fair so no disputes could arise later on (and they never did). That would’ve been back in the 1940s-1950s. Grandma reflected on it being a good working relationship between all involved, with her father viewed as a fair man in that respect who paid well and treated people decently. And his wife was known as a good cook who was generous about feeding people. And the black folks in that area (a poor county by most standards and still to this day) were happy for the work, showing up on time as requested, content with the wages offered in an era before minimums became enforced. She spoke of people sharing their crops with one another and helping each other out as needed on one another’s farms.

Not that she always had nice things to say about her father. But he was by all accounts a sober man and a hard worker, and he treated people with friendliness and direct firmness so that they knew what he expected from them. That being back in the time when people had many kids so as to have low-cost laborers for their farms. My grandma was one of 6 kids, all girls except for one brother. I only knew my great-grandfather past the age of 70, he later living with my grandparents until he died at age 98. But during those years he was so old and worn out by life that I never had much of a relationship with him.

Grandma spoke about her mom and how her mom’s mom had died early on, leaving her mom to be raised by her aunt mostly. Apparently that woman wasn’t too nice of a person. Said her mom worked hard all her life. That being the running theme among nearly everybody worth mentioning in my lineage. Workhorses is what I’ve always referred to them as. The kind of people who wouldn’t know what to do with themselves if left idle. They find work to do since that’s all they know. Funny how things changed so abruptly for us younger generations who know nothing of that sort of lifestyle and can only listen to these old stories with wonder at how they managed all of that year after year, incapable of relating to their daily struggle to earn a living.

Sounded like a lot of drudgery, like the kind of life my contemporaries and I cannot relate to. We rely on a grocery store to provide everything we need today, whereas in Grandma’s time the only items they purchased at the store were flour, salt, black pepper, and occasionally lard (when a freshly slaughtered hog wasn’t available). She speaks of the wells on the property and how beef couldn’t be preserved as long as pork meat in the smokehouse. She tells of her mother sewing clothes for herself and the kids, though they sometimes went to the store to purchase church attire. And she tells of how they’d sweat in those churches, that being years before the advent of air conditioning. I don’t doubt that unto itself would prove to be hell in the Mississippi summer heat.

Hard to imagine life back then. While not so long ago, it might as well be centuries ago. So I keep asking her questions and pondering on the stories she shares. I asked her about race relations in her time, and she says it wasn’t like how it’s become these days, that people worked together then more than now because they all had hard lives. Amazing the difference a few decades and the emergence of material conveniences has made. Nowadays it’s as if some people are trying to rewrite history, pitting one race against another and pretending as though they’ve never been anything other than enemies who’ve never been able to see eye to eye. It’s a shame really that it’s come to this since many of us are rooted for generations in that same red clay soil, under the same blistering sun and its humid heat, contending with the same climate and conditions in trying to eek out an existence. Those were my ancestors just as they were some of yours too. And looking further back to pre-abolitionist days, I’ve read of the first indentured servant with my Papa’s last name to land on the east coast only to die during his servitude. Our histories aren’t as wholly separate as some like to pretend these days.

It’s as if we’re all becoming detached and divorced from history to where we’re prone to repeat generic stories passed down from those pushing an agenda, nevermind the truths of our actual lineages. That saddens me because it’s like watching something real get swept away as if it no longer matters. As if the new narrative trumps the truth. And with that, we can no longer appreciate what bonds we did possess in common, including a shared culture, for better or worse.

When I listen to her it feels like grains of sand being poured into my hands that then trickle down between my fingers and disappear into bottomless space where they might never be retrieved. Going, going, Gone. History made and history abandoned. Life’s work retold but then forgotten. Communal bonds established once upon a time, only to later be denied by future generations who care not about what came before. The past is being disposed of, like an inconvenient truth that defies the new narrative being woven. And I sit here and watch and listen as the conflicting tales pull in opposite directions and tear at the very fabric of (Southern) U.S. culture.

In a few more years all that will remain is the new retelling of racial injustices with no mercy shown to the many decades of the late 19th century and early-to-mid 20th century where progress had been made. That’s deemed obsolete, if not outright denied as a fairy tale, by those who wish to capitalize on a perpetual sense of victimhood. But they ought to see that their retelling of events isn’t accurate, that it leaves so much out, and that unto itself creates a new form of injustice that we’ll all wind up suffering from as a result. But people don’t think like that usually. Instead, they don’t look far enough ahead and like to cherry-pick the past to suit themselves. But what are you trying to suit nowadays? A grievance industry? A monopolization on righteous indignation? A false belief that only one sort of people were ever taken thorough advantage of, or, in reverse, that only one sort of people ever universally escaped hardships? It’s untrue. All might not be equal, nor would I claim that to be the case, but it’s not as unequal as some would have others believe.

So, when people go on these days talking about our roots and bloodlines and heritages, I can’t help but feel like mine has died. Perhaps never to be resurrected except in libelous narratives that attempt to rewrite history in order to bolster divisive modern political pursuits. That’s a damn shame. But I suppose this is just the way life tends to go. What once was tends to be forgotten over time. And what is here today might disappear tomorrow as well. Not sure what good it would do to try to hold onto that other than to keep it in my heart and let it inform my senses in the face of what others now wish to bring about. Not sure there’s anything else that realistically can be done.

“Patreon CEO Jack Conte LIVE: Lauren Southern, IGD, and Free Speech” (plus a look at the Community Guidelines page)

From The Rubin Report:

Hmmm…  Listened to the entire interview, read a good bit in the comment section, and now am perusing Patreon’s Community Guidelines page.

Never having signed up with that site, but was thinking of doing so to support content creators I appreciate. Now definitely having second thoughts.

Their community guidelines are entirely too vague, particularly where it comes to “hate speech,” “bullying,” “harassment,” and “serious attacks on people based on their race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability or serious medical condition.” A screenshot follows:

ScreenHunter_20 Aug. 05 19.58What the heck does that mean? Looks extremely subjectively determined to me. How could it not be? A “safe space for normal people”? Well, that right there counts me out. No point in signing up if that’s how this is going to be played since I have no idea what qualifies as “normal,” but I’m willing to bet whatever it is will wind up excluding someone like me if that’s to be determined by people who actually take the term “hate speech” seriously.

Can’t say mean things about a person’s religion? What if that religion in question is Islam? Again, I’m willing to bet that religion is most especially protected by the type of folks who’d create guidelines worded in this way.

Here’s another paragraph of interest:

ScreenHunter_21 Aug. 05 20.03All sounds fine there, right? Well, hold on. Weapons? What kinds of weapons specifically? It doesn’t say. Does that mean a channel that broadcasts gun ownership and shooting techniques might not be welcome on Patreon? Certainly looks that way. Which to me sounds like a company that’s not friendly toward the 2nd Amendment, and why would I willingly do business with a company like that? If that weren’t their intention, I figure they’d come across less ambiguous here.

See, I decided to actually look into Patreon’s guidelines for the first time today BECAUSE of Jack Conte’s behavior during the interview above. His answers didn’t jibe with me in numerous places. One minute they’re talking about that Canadian Southern gal and blocking a boat, the next Conte is comparing her actions to blocking an ambulance. AND THEN, later in the conversation when answering questions by the audience, Conte turned vague again in addressing Black Lives Matter protesters doing precisely what he brought up in the aforementioned example: blocking ambulances. Suddenly he’s back to shucking and jiving, acting like he’s not exactly sure what might violate his website’s terms and conditions, acting as though the guidelines are very technical and specific and must be assessed case by case in accordance. But look at that Community Guidelines page — barely a thing on there is spelled out in sufficient detail. So it can’t help but be a guessing game in figuring out what may or may not be deemed an account-terminating offense on there.

He said they’ll be implementing a new appeals process and warning system later this year. Okay. Surprised something like that wasn’t in place already.

And so much for Patreon being unfriendly to “hate” groups like antifa. Here’s a pro-antifa group still up on the website: https://www.patreon.com/intlantifadefence. Looked around on there and found a couple others too.

WOW! Look what I just found on Patreon: Cynthia (racist as hell — “white people aren’t human“) G: https://www.patreon.com/CynthiaG  How on EARTH has her content NOT violated their terms of service?? Nobody has contacted Patreon to report her nonstop bashing of white people, including defending black people approaching interracial couples to call them out on being together in public? What, what, what??! UGH.

That’s surprising. But Lauren Southern had to go. Of course. That totally makes sense, right?  rolleyes_smilie

This whole thing is starting to look like just another Left-leaning moneymaking enterprise. Not about supporting actual freedom of speech and open exchange of ideas. Yes, it’s great for people to have an alternative to Google’s Adsense since that’s controlled by advertisers, but it would also be good to have an alternative that doesn’t kick people off the platform for non-criminal offenses.

That settles it. Going to continue leaving that site alone and relying on Paypal when I feel like sending folks a few bucks.