“Walter Williams: The State Against Blacks” (full documentary)

Pausing 16:15 in…His argument about minimum wage laws makes sense to me, despite my “bleeding heart” side wanting to protest a human being working for $2/hr. Back when this documentary was filmed in the 1980s the minimum wage was $3.00+, now it’s what? $7.00-something? Last I checked that’s what it was in this state. But I get where Dr. Williams is coming from here in terms youths gaining valuable experience with the working world at a time when they’re typically least capable of being productive due to lacking those very job skills they’re needing to acquire through becoming employed. Remove low wage “practice” positions and you undermine youth’s education in adjusting to the ways of our capitalist economy. It is what it is, and socialistic policies haven’t improved the reality after decades of chances to demonstrate they might. We’re being forced to take in the facts of the situation, folks. My argument relating to minimum wage laws usually revolves around how the middle-class winds up squeezed financially the most since their wages are already higher than any set minimum wage and aren’t raised in accordance with it; plus, whatever benefits the poorest hope to receive wind up reduced when companies raise the costs of their products and services in relation to the wage hike so as not to lose profit.

While I remain bitterly critical of the corporatist setup that’s come to dominate what was intended to be a free market capitalist society, I no more wish to aid and abet the socialist idealists out in the society who are fighting to swing the pendulum to another, arguably more totalitarian outcome either. Both of those options suck so far as I can tell.

Dr. Williams’ next point about licensing and regulations barring people entry to various professions is something I’ve long been concerned about as well. Incredibly high cost (and only increasingly) professional licenses and other restrictions reduce our ability as citizens to compete in this corporate-dominated climate. Absolutely. Hurts us as individuals and all across the board as a people to be denied entry in fields where we might flourish despite taking a different approach than those dictating how the profession must be guarded and rendered exclusive. While I can understand why professions would want this since they stand to benefit most from such an arrangement, it’s entirely unnecessary and anti-capitalistic in many cases. Rating organizations can be employed to discern who’s who and how well they’ve performed in their services provided — government regulation isn’t needed there, by-and-large. Some regulations I can understand, particularly that which allows the market to remain free enough so that the majority of people might be capable of effectively competing within it. But there’s a line to be drawn and it comes before professionalizing nearly everything field under the sun, as has been actively occurring.

On a slight side-note, he brought up a good point about hair-dressers and how the hoop-jumping test-taking there eliminates people who actually know how to do hair but lack the education necessary to test well on paper. It’s doing hair, not solving philosophical conundrums, folks. Never understood why that field was set up as it is now, especially considering how many pathetic hair-dressers somehow still mange to graduate and become licensed. Too many people go into that line of work who have no real business there, yet their hair academies aren’t screening them out. Hence why I learned to dye, bleach, and trim my own hair. Good riddance. Gotta try out numerous hair stylists to find one worth returning to, especially if you move around as much as I have. Wish I had heard more through word of mouth so I could’ve avoided those regretted encounters. And the best hair stylist I ever wound up finding, back in Omaha, cost nearly $125 per session and wound up quitting once her pregnancy advanced. So dang. That’s a lot to pay but apparently was necessary if I wanted my hair to look like how that one woman could manipulate it. Pretty much every other stylist either didn’t take as much pride in their work or weren’t sufficiently familiar with working with my hair type or just altogether jacked my shit up. So I learned to handle it myself. Their licensing requirement doesn’t impress me much.

As for cab drivers, now that Uber is on the scene we see how a private company can still conduct screening of potential drivers while side-stepping cab licensing requirements, which is how proving to seriously undermine the status quo of that service industry. Kinda funny, if you ask me. And totally welcome. Customer reviews help reward the good drivers within their ranks and aid in removing the more questionable ones, at least in terms of being affiliated with that company specifically.

Anyway, moving on…  Pausing at 21:00, this man is right that people are confusing the road to economic success as necessarily involving first pursuing political power. That’s not it tends to shake out in the real world, past or present (as we’re bound to find out once again). Yes, on the free market we get to vote with our individual dollars rather than simply being overruled by a majority influenced by whatever ideology.

Interesting panel discussion there at the end.

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